Home » Articles » Tips and Tricks » Three Easy Ways to Fold Dumplings

Three Easy Ways to Fold Dumplings

Nov 13, 2023 | 0 comments

Shaping dumplings doesn’t have to be complicated. These are three of the easiest ways I’ve found to fold beautiful dumplings – from super simple, to slightly more complicated – all three are genuinely simple and anyone should be able to do them.

Three different styles of folded dumplings on a marble background.

Making a big batch of dumplings is one of my favourite ways to spend a lazy Sunday afternoon in the kitchen. It’s incredibly therapeutic, SO satisfying and once you’re on a bit of a roll, it’s actually a lot easier than you’d think. Over many years of making dumplings, I’ve gone through stages of dumpling shaping – from a very rough, ‘just fold it over’ style, to the prettier pleated version I tend to favour now.

These three ways to fold dumplings are my favourites, and go from super simple to slightly more complicated in terms of technique, but I promise they’re all incredibly achievable, especially with a little practice. I trying out all three and seeing which you prefer!

No matter what shape you choose, there are a couple of non-negotiables you’ll want to remember to make sure they turn out beautifully.

  • Don’t overfill your dumpling. If you’re new to dumpling making, I recommend starting with a little less filling. This will make it a lot easier to practice folding and shaping them and once you get more confident, you can increase the amount of filling.
  • Use water if needed to help seal the dumplings. This is especially needed if you’re using store-bought wrappers which will be coated in starch so they don’t stick together. Use your finger to run a little water around the edge of your wrapper before filling and sealing. Homemade wrappers are a lot easier to work with, so I encourage you to give them a go.

The siu mai one

This is hands-down the easiest way to fold a dumpling. Spoon a heaped teaspoon of filling into the middle of your dumpling wrapper, then literally pick the dumpling up, and squeeze the sides up around the filling, pressing to seal the wrapper against itself. This is how siu mai dumplings are folded, which you may have come across at Chinese restaurants or at dim sum sessions.

The gyoza one

This is the easiest way I’ve found to make a gyoza-style dumpling. Spoon your filling into the middle of your wrapper, then bring each side together at the top, pressing down against your surface to create a flat bottom for the dumpling.

Squeeze and press the edges together, to create a cheat’s pleating pattern, ensuring you squeeze any excess air out.

The pretty pleated one

This is the way I fold dumplings the majority of the time. It’s easy once you get the hang of it, and it looks so gorgeous with the little pleats. Spoon your filling into the middle of your wrapper. Then, working with one side of the wrapper, make a little fold back on itself. Repeat this about five times, until you’ve folded roughly half the wrapper.

At this point, pull the other half up and press to seal the two edges together. Use your hands to gently curve the dumpling into a half-moon shape.

Watch how to fold the dumplings

Got a question?

I’m having trouble getting the wrapper to stick – what can I do?

Use a little water around the edges of your wrapper to help it stick to itself – store-bought wrappers are caked in starch to stop them from sticking together in their packet, so you’ll need to wet the edges in order to get them to stick.

Can I store the dumplings to cook later?

I recommend freezing the dumplings – they don’t keep well in the fridge especially if you have a wet filling (it will start to seep into the wrapper, make it soggy and you may end up with tears in the dumpling). Lay your folded dumplings out onto a lined tray or plate, on one layer, then freeze until solid. Once solid, transfer to ziplock bags to store.

What’s the best way to cook the dumplings?

I tend to cook my dumplings in two ways – steamed and pan-fried. All three shapes work perfectly for these two methods. You can also boil dumplings but shape one isn’t ideal for this (as it’s open and not sealed). Steaming is easiest because you just throw them into a lined steamer (regular metal or bamboo) and then steam for about 10 minutes until the filling is cooked through.

Everything you need for dumpling night

Do you have your FREE Fakeaway Favourites e-book?

Fakeaway Favourites book cover superimposed over a bowl of colourful salad.

It’s filled with my absolute favourite takeaway dishes you can make at home!

From a quick pad thai and saag paneer, to Korean fried chicken, beef rendang and chicken satay, you’ll love exploring the book.

If this was a helpful guide, you might like these too

If you make your own dumplings, I’d love to hear from you! Which shape did you try? You can leave me a comment below.

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
Hand holding a pleated dumpling with two other dumplings in the background.

Three Easy Ways to Fold Dumplings


5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

  • Author: Kate Alexandra
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 40 dumplings
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

Shaping dumplings doesn’t have to be complicated. These are three of the easiest ways I’ve found to fold beautiful dumplings – from super simple, to slightly more complicated – all three are genuinely simple and anyone should be able to do them.

If you’re using store-bought wrappers, make sure you brush a little water around the edges when you shape the dumplings, so that the wrapper sticks together and seals.


Ingredients


Instructions

  1. The siu mai one. This is the easiest way to shape your dumplings, and it’s how I started out. If you’ve tried siu mai at dim sum restaurants, that’s essentially what this technique mimics. Spoon a tablespoon of your filling into the middle of your wrapper. Pick the wrapper up and press the sides in around the filling, leaving it open at the top. Fold and press the wrapper against itself to seal it around the edges. You’ll be left with a little open-topped parcel. You can pan-fry or steam this shape.
  2. The gyoza one. I like to think of this as the gateway to making a pleated dumpling – it’s a bit of a cheat’s pleat and it’s so easy. Spoon your filling into the middle of your wrapper, then bring either side together at the top, creating a half-moon shape. Press down against your surface to create a flat bottom for the dumpling. Squeeze and press the edges together, to create a cheat’s pleating pattern, ensuring you squeeze any excess air out. You can pan-fry, steam or boil this shape.
  3. The pretty pleated one. This is how I usually shape my dumplings.  Spoon your filling into the middle of your wrapper. Then, working with one side of the wrapper, make a little fold back on itself. Repeat this about five times, until you’ve folded roughly half the wrapper into little pleats around your filling. Pull the other half up and press to seal the two edges together. Use your hands to gently curve the dumpling into a half-moon shape. You can pan-fry, steam or boil this shape.

Notes

STORAGE INSTRUCTIONS: The best way to store shaped dumplings is to freeze them. You can then cook them straight from frozen when you’re ready. Freeze on a single layer, on a lined tray or plate. When solid, transfer them to ziplock bags.

NEED FILLING IDEAS? Try this juicy pork dumpling filling, or chicken and mushroom filling. Dumplings are also a wonderful way to use up any leftovers – curries are particularly tasty.

  • Prep Time: 30
  • Category: fakeaways
  • Method: no cook
  • Cuisine: asian

Welcome!

I’m Kate, the creator behind Dished. I love creating flavour packed, simple (ish) recipes for you, designed for every day and special occasions.

GET YOUR FREE

Fakeaway

Favourites

E-BOOK NOW

This e-book includes my absolute favourite fakeaway recipes (popular takeaway dishes you can make at home!)

Leave a comment & rate this recipe

your email will not be published

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe rating 5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star